Remembering Heavy D: What We Can All Learn From His Life (And Death)

LAS VEGAS, NV - JUNE 15: Heavy D performs onstage during the BACARDI "Like It Live" Las Vegas event with Cee-Lo Green, Travis Barker and Mix Master Mike held at the Marquee Nightclub at The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas on June 15, 2011 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images for Bacardi)

(Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images for Bacardi)

Heavy D was one of the most beloved rappers in our time.  He was responsible for bringing Sean “Diddy” Combs and Usher into the music business as well.  So it’s no wonder that the entire music community took it hard when he died five years ago.

Results from an autopsy conducted on the “Big Tyme” rapper reveal his November 8, 2011 death at the age of 44 was caused by a pulmonary embolism. Jamaican-born American rapper, record producer, singer, actor, and the former leader of Heavy D & the Boyz, was loved by many all over the world. Fans often quoted his word and tongue play term he used to use, “My diddly-diddly-D.”

The Los Angeles County Coroner’s Office confirmed that Heavy D, born Dwight Arrington Myers, died after suffering from a deep vein thrombosis, in which a blood clot in the leg traveled to his lung and blocked a main artery, resulting in the pulmonary embolism.

Heavy penned hits like “Somebody for Me,” “Black Coffee” and more.  The Overweight Lover as he was called was smooth on the mic and even credited with bringing Usher to Puffy Combs for his first album.

The condition is often associated with flying, and shortly before he passed away the hip-hopster had reportedly seen a doctor for a persistent cough he developed after a recent trip to London. He had also performed at the Michael Jackson tribute concert on Oct. 8 in Cardiff, Wales.

Another contributing factor was heart disease, which caused his artery walls to thicken due to high cholesterol.

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The coroner ruled the manner of death as “natural” and said toxicology tests showed that prescription medicine the performer may have been taking was not a factor.

(photo courtesy of VEVO screenshot)

(photo courtesy of VEVO screenshot)

 

Deep vein thrombosis can develop if you have certain medical conditions that affect how your blood clots. Deep vein thrombosis can also happen if you don’t move for a long time, such as after surgery, following an accident, or when you are confined to a hospital or nursing home bed.

 

To prevent DVT, here’s three common things to consider:

1.) Avoid sitting still. If you’ve had surgery or have been on bed rest for other reasons, try to get moving as soon as possible. If you’re sitting for a while, try not to cross your legs because this can limit blood flow. If you’re traveling a long distance by car,…