Seniors & The Flu Shot

    “This basically confirms what we’ve believed to be true,” Kelley said. “But this is the first time [the research] has gotten to this technical of a level.”

    Another expert said the study provides helpful new information for researchers.

    “We’ve known for years that older adults don’t respond as well to the flu vaccine,” said Dr. Andrew Pavia, chief of pediatric infectious diseases at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City. “This gives us some insights into why.”

    And a better understanding of older people’s immune response could help in developing better flu vaccines, according to Pavia, who also chairs the Pandemic Influenza Task Force of the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

    Both Pavia and Kelley said that ultimately, what’s needed is a flu shot that’s more effective for seniors — and for children younger than 2, Pavia noted.

    There is already a high-dose flu vaccine on the market, specifically designed for people age 65 and up. Researchers know it can spur older immune systems to produce more antibodies.

    “But,” Pavia said, “we don’t know yet if that means better protection against the flu after people are vaccinated.”

    For now, study author Jiang said that older adults can take some extra steps to protect themselves. One is to get your flu shot early, since it takes about two weeks for the body to build up immunity. In the United States, flu season can begin as early as October.

    Older people may also want to avoid being around others who are sick, and be vigilant for potential flu symptoms, Jiang said. Those include fever, chills, sore throat, headache and body aches.

    Jiang advised calling your doctor right away if you have those symptoms: There are prescription anti-flu drugs, but they work best if you start them within two days of developing symptoms.

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