Without A Home, But Not Without Help

    Homelessness is associated with disproportionate rates of various chronic and infectious diseases, poor mental health, substance abuse, and violence. These are real public health issues, and CDC is committed to addressing these issues in our public health work. Whether it’s providing epi-aid assistance for a TB outbreak in a shelter, or facilitating integrative STD/HIV/Hepatitis/TB screening and treatment services for those affected by unstable housing, we are committed to ensuring the opportunity for good health to all through enhanced prevention efforts and improved access to care.

    The communities of persons affected by homelessness and those at risk of having inadequate or unstable housing are unfortunately growing. With the increase in foreclosures and other economic challenges, we must find ways to respond to the health needs of all populations. This country leads the world in many areas related to health, e.g., medical research and care, but we are not in the top 25 healthiest nations. But we can be again through ingenuity, commitment, awareness, and compassion. To succeed, we must be aware of individual and community factors in all populations. It is not one size fits all. We must provide health services in ways that fit the community, the city, and the individual.

    Addressing the public health needs of the homeless population requires collaborative and integrative efforts across CDC and with our partners and constituents. Together, we are working to identify ways we can improve health across the spectrum of factors and environments that affect health choices. There is much that we can do to expand the way we think, talk about, and act to improve the health of all people in this country.

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