New CDC Survey: 1 In 10 Americans Are Taking Antidepressants

Pill containterYou go in for a regular checkup. Your doctor asks you about certain symptoms, such as difficulty sleeping and/or feeling a little more down than usual. Next thing you know, you’re walking out of your doctor’s office with a prescription for an antidepressant.

“Often patients don’t come in saying, ‘I’m depressed,’ they come in with an incredible amount of different signs — headaches, trouble sleeping, for instance — but a deeper consultation will reveal that they are,” says Levy, an assistant professor of Medicine Mount Sinai School of Medicine. Now Garay sees Levy once every few weeks to check in, manage her symptoms, and discuss any issues, Levy says. According to Garay, the medication has “helped tremendously.”

Levy is one of many family doctors that are taking on the role of therapist with their patients.

According to new survey data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, one in 10 Americans older than 12 are now taking antidepressants — a fourfold increase in the prevalence of antidepressant use since the late 1980s.

While antidepressant use is on the rise, it’s not always mental health professionals that are writing the scripts: less than one third of patients on antidepressants reported seeing a mental health professional within the past year.