How Women Can Boost Their Sexual Desire

A unhappy couple lying apart in bedNot in the mood for sex? You’re not alone – women are having less boom in the bedroom than movies and magazines would have us believe. Drug companies have long tried to make a drug that can fire up a woman’s libido. So far, the FDA hasn’t approved any drug for that purpose. Still, there are effective treatments, and they don’t all come in a bottle.

The first step is to find out what’s going on.

What’s Causing the Problem?

When you’re taking care of yourself physically and emotionally, and when you’re in a good relationship, your sex drive is bound to be better than when you’re not.

Some of the things that can dim women’s sex drive include:

  • Physical issues, including hormonal changes related to menopause or childbirth, or thyroid problems.
  • Chronic stress, including in your relationship.
  • Depression or other mental health issues.
  • Some prescription drugs may also affect libido, including some types of antidepressants, birth control pills, anti-anxiety drugs, and blood pressure medications.

It’s usually not just one thing. These issues can affect each other.

Reviving Your Libido

Some natural remedies include:

Ashwaganda Root – The Kama Sutra identifies ashwagandha as a potent igniter of passion and desire. While that benefit may get your immediate attention, its popularity with women has more to do with the way it stimulates libido and increases satisfaction. The herb may increase blood flow to the clitoris and other female sexual organs, creating an intense sexual experience.

Maca root – This has been the go-to herb for women living in the Andes for centuries. Maca’s high iodine content supports a woman’s hormone balance and its high zinc levels, an essential mineral for sex hormones, does more than fan the flames of desire. Women who took maca root in one study reported improved sexual experiences and satisfaction.

Ginkgo biloba – an extract derived from the leaf of the Chinese ginkgo tree, is another herb found to treat antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction.

You should also talk with your doctor or a counselor about what you’re going through. For example, your primary care doctor may be able to address the physical aspects, but you may also benefit from relationship counseling or sex therapy.

Your doctor should check your overall health, review any medications you’re taking, and talk with you about…