Antidepressant Use in Pregnancy: Autism Risk?

    Sleeping familyChildren born to women who take SSRI antidepressants during pregnancy may have a slight increase in risk for developing autism spectrum disorder (ASD), a new study suggests.

    Researchers compared the use of antidepressants among mothers of children with and without ASD. They found that those who had taken selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) were more than twice as likely to have a child with an ASD diagnosis.

    Autism spectrum disorder was uncommon in both groups, and the finding does not prove that SSRI use directly contributed to the children’s ASD.

    This is the first study that has shown a possible association between SSRI use and autism and the findings should be considered preliminary.

    Autism Diagnosis

    Typically diagnosed in early childhood, autism spectrum disorder is characterized by problems with social interaction, verbal and nonverbal communication, and repetitive behaviors or interests.

    Autism spectrum disorders include autism, Asperger’s syndrome, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified.

    There has been a huge increase in the diagnosis of autism and related disorders in recent decades. While increased understanding and diagnosis of these conditions may explain the increase, there is also concern that as-yet unidentified environmental influences may be causing more children to develop ASD.

    Antidepressant use among women in their childbearing years, especially use of SSRIs, has also increased dramatically in recent decades. These records were compared to those of just over 1,500 children without an autism spectrum disorder.

    Twenty mothers of children with ASD (6.7%) and 50 mothers of children without ASD (3.35%) had at least one prescription for an antidepressant in the year prior to giving birth.

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