The ABC’s Of ADHD

A little boy taking a book from a shelfWho today has not heard the term “attention deficit hyperactivity disorder,” or ADHD? No other term in the diagnostic lexicon has more information and misinformation attached to it than ADHD. Everyone you ask — parents, doctors, teachers, psychologists, nurses, neighbors or relatives — will have an opinion on this disorder, and likely their opinions will all differ. Some will toss it off and say their child is just very animated. Some will insist that a child be medicated right away. Others will be adamant that children should never be medicated. Others will claim that eliminating sugar from the diet will eliminate the problem. Still others will question whether there is anything to the diagnosis at all.

Since first identified as a diagnosis, ADHD has been given a great deal of attention by neurologists and psychologists. ADHD is now widely recognized as a legitimate mental health problem. Although its exact definition continues to be debated, ADHD is thought to be a neurological impairment, probably originating in the frontal lobes of the brain, affecting a child’s ability to control his or her impulses. Lacking the ability to control their impulses, these children do and say whatever occurs to them from minute to minute. They are quite literally out of control.

There has been a great deal of research to better understand what causes children to have ADHD. Among the identified causes are: heredity (a parent or other close relative with ADHD, although it may have gone unrecognized); problems at birth; and possibly some kind of early emotional trauma that had an effect on the processing mechanisms of the brain.
In some ways, children with ADHD are no different from their peers. One key diagnostic feature noted in children with ADHD is the intense, often frantic quality of their activity. These children are on the move most of the time: climbing the cupboards, tearing about the room, turning over every object that isn’t nailed down — an unending streak of activity and mischief. They quickly wear out their clothes and toys, and usually have more than their share of accidents.

Short Attention Spans