Life After Pregnancy


african american woman smiling(BlackDoctor.org) — Pregnancy and the time after you deliver your baby can be wonderful, exciting, emotional, stressful, and tiring—all at once. Experiencing this whirlwind of feelings may cause you to overeat, not eat enough, or lose your drive and energy. Being good to yourself can help you cope with your feelings and follow eating and physical activity habits for a healthy pregnancy, a healthy baby, and a healthy family after delivery.

Here are some ideas for being good to yourself:

  • Try to get enough sleep.
  • Rent a funny movie and laugh.
  • Take pleasure in the miracles of pregnancy and birth.
  • Invite people whose company you enjoy to visit your new family member.
  • Explore groups that you and your newborn can join, such as “new moms” groups.

Remember…

  • Talk to your health care provider about how much weight you should gain during your pregnancy.
  • Eat foods rich in folate, iron, calcium, and protein, or get these nutrients through a prenatal supplement.
  • Talk to your health care provider before taking any supplements.
  • Eat breakfast every day.
  • Eat high-fiber foods and drink plenty of water to avoid constipation.
  • Avoid alcohol, raw fish, fish high in mercury, soft cheeses, and anything that is not food.
  • Aim to do at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity on most, if not all, days of the week during your pregnancy. Talk to your health care provider before you begin if you have not previously been physically active.
  • After pregnancy, slowly get back to your routine of regular, moderate-intensity physical activity. Make sure you feel able and your health care provider says it is safe to be physically active.
  • Take pleasure in the miracles of pregnancy and birth.

 

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