What You Need To Know About Lung Cancer

    Understanding Lung
    Cancer

    Cancers that begin in the lungs are divided into two major types, non-small cell lung cancer and small cell lung cancer, depending on how the cells look
    under a microscope. Each type of lung cancer grows and spreads in different ways
    and is treated differently.

    Nonsmall cell lung cancer is more common than small cell lung cancer,
    and it generally grows and spreads more slowly. There are three main types of
    non-small cell lung cancer. They are named for the type of cells in which the
    cancer develops: squamous cell carcinoma (also
    called epidermoid carcinoma), adenocarcinoma, and large cell
    carcinoma
    .

    Small cell lung cancer, sometimes called oat
    cell cancer
    , is less common than non-small cell lung cancer. This
    type of lung cancer grows more quickly and is more likely to spread to other
    organs in the body.

    Cancers that begin in the lungs are divided into two major
    types, non-small cell lung cancer and small cell lung cancer, depending on how
    the cells look under a microscope. Each type of lung cancer grows and spreads in
    different ways and is treated differently.

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    Lung Cancer: Who’s at
    Risk?

    Researchers have discovered several causes of lung cancer — most are related
    to the use of tobacco.

    • Cigarettes. Smoking cigarettes causes lung cancer. Harmful substances,
      called carcinogens, in tobacco damage the
      cells in the lungs. Over time, the damaged cells may become cancerous. The
      likelihood that a smoker will develop lung cancer is affected by the age at
      which smoking began, how long the person has smoked, the number of cigarettes
      smoked per day, and how deeply the smoker inhales. Stopping smoking greatly
      reduces a person’s risk for developing lung cancer.

    • Cigars and Pipes. Cigar and pipe smokers have a higher risk of lung
      cancer than nonsmokers. The number of years a person smokes, the number of pipes
      or cigars smoked per day, and how deeply the person inhales all affect the risk
      of developing lung cancer. Even cigar and pipe smokers who do not inhale are at
      increased risk for lung, mouth, and other types of cancer.

    • Environmental Tobacco Smoke. The chance of developing lung cancer is
      increased by exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) — the smoke in the
      air when someone else smok

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