Dr. Olivia J. Hooker: Last Survivor Of Black Wall Street

Home to over 10,000 Black residents, Black Wall Street, also known as the Greenwood neighborhood in Tulsa, Oklahoma, was one of the most prominent concentrations of African-American businesses in the United States during the early 20th century.

People would watch movies at the Black-owned Bill Williams Dreamland Theater.
People would shop for their essentials at Black-owned D. L. Hookers General Stores.
People would get treated for health issues at Dr. A. C. Jackson, an African-American Surgeon.
Many people would stay, have meetings and events at the Black-owned Stratford Hotel.
People would get ice cream, cakes and candy at Williams Confectionary.

That is until the massacre. Later called the Tulsa race riot of 1921, white residents massacred hundreds of black residents and torched the neighborhood within hours. The riot was one of the most devastating massacres in the history of U.S. race relations, destroying the once thriving Greenwood community.

Many say the massacre started when a young, Black man, who was getting off the elevator, tripped and grabbed hold of a white woman to keep his balance.