Fit & Fabulous: It’s YOUR Vote!

Fit & Fabulous logo with a smiling, lunging woman, a yellow tape measure and an orange dumbbellDo you exercise? Do you eat right? Have you overcome an illness? Are you a parent who keeps your family healthy and strong? BlackDoctor.org calls ALL these things and more living the Fit & Fabulous lifestyle!

Every month, we want to REWARD you and share your inspirational stories of health & hope with the world! So vote for your favorite contestant TODAY!

CONTEST RULES

• Tell us in 100 words or less why you are fit and fabulous.
• Submit either a recent photo or video.
• All entries must be submitted by October 29, 2012 at 12 NOON. The winner will be announced on November 2, 2012 at 12 NOON.

PRIZES

• $250 Cash!
• A feature story on the BlackDoctor.org website!

Watch Chad “OchoCinco” Johnson Be Fired For Behavior [VIDEO]

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Studios, companies, and teams typically try to guard against bad behavior–especially from their youngest stars–by loading up their contracts with so-called morals and behavior clauses; such provisions give the execs a legal out should they decide to cut ties.

Read:Chad “Ochocinco” Johnson Apologizes For Domestic Violence: “I Love Evelyn To Death”

A morals clause is part of a contract that defines certain behaviors that are unacceptable to a party. If the conduct defined in the morals clause comes into question, then the contract may be voidable or subject to termination. The reasoning here is that the party contracting with the sports figure or film and television star has been subjected to conduct that is detrimental to their interest; or it devalues the performance due under the contract.

Historically, morals clauses have been thought to be too vague to be enforceable when drafted in a catch-all manner–like “X may terminate this contract upon written notice to Y if Y shall at any time fail, refuse, or neglect to conform their behavior to the moral standards of the community.” Doesn’t that clause just feel too sweeping to have any effect. Nobody should be able to define what a person can or can’t do in their personal life right?