Top 10 Tips For A Better Butt

A woman doing an up dog yoga postureTo lift, shape and tone your gluteals—a.k.a. butt muscles—burn off unwanted fat on and around your butt with cardio, it takes a combination of good eating, strength exercises, and all day mini-workouts.

Want a butt that looks good or even better in everything from jeans and pencil skirts to shorts and a swimsuit? Here are the top 10 tips and tricks that’ll get your backside fine in no time:

1. Eat To Grow

Your glutes are just like any other muscle in that they need protein and calories to grow. To support your training, add calories to your diet by way of lean proteins such as chicken breasts, egg whites and tuna. Fuel your workouts with complex carbs like oatmeal, brown rice and sweet potatoes.

2. Eat Clean

Choose natural unprocessed foods first and foremost. Keep in mind the longer something remains eatable on your shelf the longer it will remain on your thighs. Strive to consume the majority of your calories from whole foods rather than shakes and bars. Look for natural carbs in the forms of fruits and veggies, and healthy dietary fat from sources such as coconut oil, olive oil, raw nuts, seeds, and avocado. Keep processed foods, grains, soy, refined sugars, dairy, and diet products with artificial sweeteners in them to a minimum, if at all.

3. Walk Stairs Or Hills As Much As Possible

When you walk the stairs, or up a hill, you are directly putting stress on the back of the leg and the butt area.  This is the perfect way to tone, tighten, strengthen, and smooth out the areas.  There is no magic number, or steepness, but if either are available, try to walk them.  Over time, this will not only help you lose the cellulite and tone the area, but it will give your butt a nice lift that is even better than the results you can get with surgery.

4. Squeeeeeeeze!

Have you ever heard of isometric butt squeezes? Basically, this will involve you laying face down and squeezing your butt together as long and as hard as you possibly can. Your butt will tone up and you’ll lose some butt fat in just a few weeks If you hold your breath when doing these exercises, it’ll make them even more effective!

5. Cardiovascular & Weight Training

Cardiovascular exercises are the best form of exercises to perform. You need to make sure you are moving your body for at least thirty minutes each day. Weight training is also a good method to use and it can help you not only lose butt fat, but build up muscle.

6. Spot Train Those Glutes

If you are working out, and still see no improvements in your butt fat, you’ve got to pay more attention to that very area. Surely, you’ll be losing weight all over, but to tone that specific muscle groups, you should give more attention to spot training your butt. Make sure you spend a good half of your work out on toning that butt!

7. Try the 30-Second Rule

Instead of rushing through squats and lunges, hold for 30 seconds at the lowest point of the move. This not only helps to spice up your routine but also allows you to take an extra-deep contraction through your glutes and core and stabilize your spine before lifting back up.

8. Take It Sloooow

You may see people swinging their weights quickly at the gym, or you may even do it yourself. We know — the faster you lift, the sooner you’ll finish — but rushing through your strength routine not only cheats the clock but also shortchanges you of your results. Slow down by pretending you’re underwater; take at least 4 counts to lower into a squat, and then 2 to 3 to come up. Your muscles will have time to fully contract, maximizing the move’s potential.

9. Do Mini-Workouts All Day Long

Try to make the most of mini breaks throughout my day. Keep a set of ankle weights in your desk drawer and do standing leg lifts or leg extensions during phone calls. Waiting in line at the bank becomes a chance to do calf raises; on walks, do lunges here and there. All those quickies add up to a better booty.

10. Tone While You Walk

With each step, when one leg extends behind you, keep your heel on the ground as long as possible. When you do lift your heel, roll through the foot, then push off with your toes. You’ll feel your glutes contract with every step.

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Disabled? You Can Still Exercise!

A basketball sitting in the seat of a wheelchairBeing disabled or having chronic pain or illness makes exercise difficult if not impossible. But don’t lose hope. Exercise can be performed by just about everyone—including individuals with limited mobility. In fact, those who suffer from joint problems, weight issues, injury, or illness will find great benefit in performing regular physical activity.

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Exercise not only helps control weight and strengthens muscles, but it reduces the risk of various diseases, boosts energy, strengthens bones, lengthens the life span, improves mood, sex life, sleep patterns and may even help prevent or manage addictions–whether they be to drugs, food, or anything else.

With a little creativity and dedication, physical activity can become part of anyone’s lifestyle. Here’s how:

What Types Of Exercise Are Possible With A Disability?

It’s important to remember that any type of exercise will offer health benefits. Mobility issues inevitably make some types of exercise easier than others, but no matter your physical situation, you should aim to incorporate three different types of exercise into your routines:

  1. Cardiovascular exercises that raise your heart rate and increase your endurance. These can include walking, running, cycling, dancing, tennis, swimming, water aerobics, or “aquajogging”. Many people with mobility issues find exercising in water especially beneficial as it supports the body and reduces the risk of muscle or joint discomfort. Even if you’re confined to a chair or wheelchair, it’s still possible to perform cardiovascular exercise.
  2. Strength training exercises involve using weights or other resistance to build muscle and bone mass, improve balance, and prevent falls. If you have limited mobility in your legs, your focus will be on upper body strength training. Similarly, if you have a shoulder injury, for example, your focus will be more on strength training your legs and abs.
  3. Flexibility exercises help enhance your range of motion, prevent injury, and reduce pain and stiffness. These may include stretching exercises and yoga. Even if you have limited mobility in your legs, for example, you may still benefit from stretches and flexibility exercises to prevent or delay further muscle atrophy.

First, Talk To Your Doctor

Your doctor or physical therapist can help you find a suitable exercise routine. Ask:

  • How much exercise can I do each day and each week?
  • What type of exercise should I do?
  • What exercises or activities should I avoid?
  • Should I take medication at a certain time around my exercise routine?

How To Exercise With Limited Mobility

1. Starting an exercise routine

  • Start slow and gradually increase your activity level. Start with an activity you enjoy, go at your own pace, and keep your goals manageable. Accomplishing even the smallest fitness goals will help you gain body confidence and keep you motivated.
  • Make exercise part of your daily life. Plan to exercise at the same time every day and combine a variety of exercises to keep you from getting bored.
  • Stick with it. It takes about a month for a new activity to become a habit. Write down your reasons for exercising and a list of goals and post them somewhere visible to keep you motivated. Focus on short-term goals, such as improving your mood and reducing stress, rather than goals such as weight loss, which can take longer to achieve. It’s easier to stay motivated if you enjoy what you’re doing, so find ways to make exercise fun. Listen to music or watch a TV show while you workout, or exercise with friends.
  • Expect ups and downs. Don’t be discouraged if you skip a few days or even a few weeks. It happens. Just get started again and slowly build up to your old momentum.

2. Staying safe when exercising

  • Stop exercising if you experience pain, discomfort, nausea, dizziness, lightheadedness, chest pain, irregular heartbeat, shortness of breath, or clammy hands. Listening to your body is the best way to avoid injury.
  • Avoid activity involving an injured body part. If you have an upper body injury, exercise your lower body while the injury heals, and vice versa. When exercising after an injury has healed, start back slowly, using lighter weights and less resistance
  • Warm up, stretch, and cool down. Warm up with a few minutes of light activity such as walking, arm swinging, and shoulder rolls, followed by some light stretching (avoid deep stretches when your muscles are cold). After your exercise routine, whether it’s cardiovascular, strength training, or flexibility exercise, cool down with a few more minutes of light activity and deeper stretching.
  • Drink plenty of water. Your body performs best when it’s properly hydrated.
  • Wear appropriate clothing, such as supportive footwear and comfortable clothing that won’t restrict your movement.