The 7 Best Exercises For Your Best Body

african american woman on the beach with a weight in hand(BlackDoctor.org) – What if your workout was guaranteed to give you great results? These seven exercises deliver just that — whether you do them at a gym or at home. Pay close attention to your form. If you’re new to exercise, over 40, have a health problem, or take regular medication, check with your doctor before starting a fitness program.

1. Walking

Why to do it: You can walk anywhere, anytime, either on a treadmill or with no equipment other than a good pair of shoes.

How to do it: Beginners should start by walking five to 10 minutes at a time, gradually moving up to at least 30 minutes per session. As you progress, lengthen the time of your walks before boosting your speed or incline.

2. Interval Training

Why to do it: Adding interval training to your cardio workout can boost fitness, burn more calories, and help you lose weight. The basic idea: Vary the intensity of your aerobic workout to challenge your body instead of loafing in your comfort zone.

How to do it: Push up the pace for a minute or two, then back off for 2-10 minutes, depending on the length of your workout and how much time you need to recover. Do this throughout the workout.

3. Squats

Why to do it: Squats work multiple muscle groups — the quadriceps, hamstrings, and gluteals — at the same time.

How to do it: Keep your feet shoulder-width apart and your back straight. Bend your knees and lower your rear as if you were sitting down in a chair, keeping your knees over your ankles.

Technique Tip: Practice with a real chair to master this move. First, sit all the way down in the chair and stand back up. Next, don’t sit all the way down; barely touch the chair’s seat before standing back up. Lastly, graduate to doing squats without a chair.

4. Lunges

Why to do it: Like squats, lunges work all the major muscles of the lower body. Lunges also help improve your balance.

How to do it: Take a big step forward, keeping your spine straight. Bend your front knee to approximately 90 degrees. Keep weight on your back toes and drop the back knee toward the floor– but don’t let it touch the floor.

Extra Challenge: Try stepping not just forward, but back and out to each side, with each lunge.

5. Push-ups

Why to do it: Push-ups strengthen the chest, shoulders, triceps, and core muscles.

How to do it: Face-down, place hands slightly wider than shoulder-width apart. Place toes or knees on the floor, creating a smooth line with your body, from shoulders to knees or feet. Keeping rear-end muscles and abdominals engaged, lower and lift your body by bending and straightening your elbows, keeping your torso stable throughout the move.

Push-ups: Too Hard? Too Easy? Beginners may start doing push-ups by placing their hands on their kitchen counters and pushing up and down, then working their way down to a desk or chair, onto the floor with knees bent, and on the floor on their toes. To make it harder, put your feet on a stair, bench, or couch while maintaining good form.

6. Abdominal Crunches

Method A
Begin by lying on your back with feet flat on the floor and palms supporting your head. Press your low back down. Contract abdominals and raise first your head (tucking your chin slightly), then your neck, shoulders, and upper back off the floor.

Method B
Do crunches with your feet off the floor and knees bent. This technique may help you avoid arching your back; it also engages your hip flexors.

Ab Troubleshooting: Keep your neck in line with your spine. Don’t stick your chin out. Don’t hold your breath. To keep chest and shoulders open, keep your elbows out of your line of vision.

7. Bent-Over Row

Why to do it: The bent-over row works all the major muscles of the upper back, as well as the biceps.

How to do it: Stand with feet shoulder-width apart, bend knees, and flex forward at the hips, then engage the abdominals and extend spine to add support. Hold weights beneath the shoulders with hands shoulder-width apart. Flex elbows and lift both hands toward the sides of body. Pause, then slowly lower hands to the starting position.

Tip: Beginners should perform the move without weights. If you have trouble doing this exercise standing up, support your weight by sitting on an incline bench, facing backward.

 

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How To Recognize & Treat AIDS Wasting Syndrome

hiv aids in background with pills sitting on top of the words(BlackDoctor.org) — AIDS wasting syndrome is the involuntary loss of more than 10% of body weight, plus more than 30 days of either diarrhea, weakness and/or fever. Wasting is linked to disease progression and death. Losing just 5% of body weight can have the same negative effects.

Wasting is still an ongoing problem for people with AIDS, even people whose HIV is controlled by medications.

What Causes AIDS Wasting?

Several factors contribute to AIDS wasting:

• Low food intake. Low appetite is common with HIV. Also, some AIDS drugs have to be taken with an empty stomach, or with a meal. It can be difficult for some people with AIDS to eat when they’re hungry. Drug side effects such as nausea, changes in the sense of taste, or tingling around the mouth also decrease appetite. Also, opportunistic infections in the mouth or throat can make it painful to eat. Infections in the gut can make people feel full after eating just a little food. Finally, lack of money or energy may make it difficult to shop for food or prepare meals.

• Poor nutrient absorption. Healthy people absorb nutrients through the small intestine. In people with HIV disease, several infections (including parasites) can interfere with this process. HIV may directly affect the intestinal lining and reduce nutrient absorption. Diarrhea causes loss of calories and nutrients.

• Altered metabolism. Food processing and protein building are affected by HIV disease. Even before any symptoms show up, you need more energy. This might be caused by the increased activity of the immune system. People with HIV need more calories just to maintain their body weight.

Hormone levels can affect the metabolism. HIV seems to change some hormone levels. Also, cytokines play a role in wasting. Cytokines are proteins that produce inflammation to help the body fight infections. People with HIV have very high levels of cytokines. This makes the body produce more fats and sugars, but less protein.

Unfortunately, these factors can work together to create a “downward spiral.” For example, infections may increase the body’s energy requirements. At the same time, they can interfere with nutrient absorption and cause fatigue. This can reduce appetite and make people less able to shop for or cook their meals. They eat less, which accelerates the process.

How Is Wasting Treated?

There is no standard treatment for AIDS wasting. However, successful antiretroviral treatment usually leads to healthy weight gain. Treatments for wasting deal with each of the causes mentioned above.

• Reducing nausea and vomiting helps increase food intake. Also, appetite stimulants including Megace and Marinol have been used. Megace, unfortunately, is associated with increases in body fat. Marinol (dronabinol) is sometimes used to increase appetite. It is a synthetic form of a substance found in marijuana. Medications that fight nausea can also help.
AIDS activists have long urged the legalization of marijuana. It reduces nausea and stimulates the appetite. In the late 1990s, several states legalized the medical use of marijuana. See Fact Sheet 731 for more information on marijuana.

• Treating diarrhea and opportunistic infections in the intestines helps alleviate poor nutrient absorption. There has been a lot of progress in this area. However, two parasitic infections — cryptosporidiosis and microsporidiosis — are still extremely difficult to treat.

Another approach is the use of nutritional supplements that have been specifically designed to provide easy-to-absorb nutrients. However, they have not been carefully studied and contain a lot of sugar. Consult with your health care provider before using nutritional supplements. Also, remember that supplements should be used in addition to a balanced diet.

• Treating changes in metabolism. Hormone treatments are being examined. Human growth hormone (Serostim) increases weight and lean body mass, while decreasing fat mass. However, it is extremely expensive, can cause serious side effects, and can cost over $40,000 per year. Some nutritional experts believe it can be effective at doses lower than the FDA-approved dose.

Testosterone and anabolic (muscle building) agents like oxandrolone or nandrolone might also help treat wasting. They have been studied alone and in combination with exercise.

Progressive resistance training (PRT) is a form of exercise using small weights. A recent study found that PRT gave similar results to oxandrolone (an anabolic steroid) in increasing lean body mass. PRT was also more effective than oxandrolone in increasing physical functioning. It is also less expensive.

Stay Aware Of Your Weight

AIDS wasting is not well understood. However, it is clear that people with HIV disease need to avoid the loss of lean body mass. Various treatments for wasting are being studied.

Be sure to monitor your weight. Maintain your intake of nutritious foods even if your appetite is low. Get treatment right away for serious diarrhea or any infection of your digestive system, as these might cause problems with the absorption of nutrients.