California Woman Awarded $70M In Johnson & Johnson Baby Powder/Ovarian Cancer Lawsuit

spilled baby powderA California woman was awarded $70 million in her lawsuit alleging that long-term use of Johnson & Johnson’s baby powder caused her ovarian cancer.

The decision in favor of Deborah Giannecchini by a St. Louis jury was announced Thursday. Johnson & Johnson plans to appeal, the Associated Press reported.

This verdict follows two similar lawsuits in St. Louis in which juries awarded plaintiffs a combined $127 million. However, two other lawsuits in New Jersey were dismissed by a judge who said there wasn’t reliable evidence that talc leads to ovarian cancer.

Similar lawsuits have been filed by about 2,000 women and lawyers are reviewing thousands of other potential cases, the AP reported.

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Viola Davis To Black Women: Self Care “Is Not A Sign Of Weakness”

(Photo credit: BET.com)

Shondaland superstar Viola Davis is teaming up with Vaseline skincare brand to promote more self-care among Black women.

The project is called The Vaseline Healing Project. Through this, the “How To Get Away With Murder” actress is encouraging people in underserved communities – especially Black women — to stand up for their health.

Meanwhile, for dermatological care, Vaseline Jelly and medical supplies are being given to impoverished communities around the world, according to the project’s website.

“I think people forget how much we hold in as Black women, how much our health is affected by outside factors,” Davis told The Huffington Post. “We have a tendency to care for everyone else, other than ourselves. We have a tendency to always feel like we’ve got to suck it in.”

(Photo credit: Twitter)

Hair is one of the issues being tackled in The Vaseline Healing Project. According to the American Academy of Dermatology, African-American women are prone to hair loss. The no. 1 cause of this is central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia, a condition where the hair follicles become inflamed, causing scarring and permanent hair loss.

One expert, dermatologist Yolanda M. Lenzy of the University of Connecticut, says Black women may be increasing their chances of hair loss due to damaging hair styles such as braids, weaves and chemical relaxing.