3 Things To Know About Exercising On Your Period

African American woman yoga outside exerciseIt’s that time of the month. You’re irritable, exhausted and maybe even nauseated. While finding refuge on the couch in fetal position may seem like the move, believe it or not, hitting the gym – the last thing on your mind – is the way to go for alleviating common symptoms associated with your period.

Here’s what you should know.

1. Exercise can help alleviate symptoms.

While exercise won’t necessarily lighten your flow, it can help lessen symptoms associated with PMS, such as unsightly belly bloat, headache, fatigue, cramps and breast pain due to swelling.

According to a study published in the Crescent Journal of Medical and Biological Sciences, after investigating the relationship between premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and physical activity, aerobic power, and anaerobic power in 367 female high school students – 40 students of which “had the highest PMS score,” researchers found a promising correlation between physical activity and menstrual woes.

“It can be concluded that lifestyle modification with an emphasis on increasing physical activity, especially aerobic activities, can be effective in reducing PMS,” the study reads.

Meanwhile, the results of another study showed that people performing moderate exercise are protected from this syndrome altogether.

The American Heart Association suggests a minimum of 150 minutes moderate exercise per week or 75 minutes per week of vigorous exercise (or a combination of moderate and vigorous activity). Thirty minutes a day, five times a week is an easy goal to remember.