5 Facts About Surrogate Pregnancy

woman visiting pregnant friendKanye West and wife Kim Kardashian join a growing list of celebrities who have opted to use a surrogate to expand their empires. While each family comes to the decision for different reasons, according to the reality star, suffering from placenta accreta –  a condition in which the placenta grows into the wall of the womb preventing it from easily detaching at the time of birth – weighed heavily on their choice.

“My doctor had to stick his entire arm in me and detach the placenta with his hand, scraping it away from my uterus with his fingernails. How disgusting and painful!!!” Kardashian-West wrote in her blog about giving birth to her first child, while managing the condition which affects five percent of women giving birth.

“My mom was crying; she had never seen anything like this before. My delivery was fairly easy, but then going through that—it was the most painful experience of my life! They gave me a second epidural but we were racing against time, so I just had to deal.”

A gestational carrier and a traditional surrogate are NOT one in the same.

A traditional surrogate gets pregnant using her own egg and the father’s sperm via in vitro fertilization (IVF) or intrauterine insemination — in which sperm are placed directly in the uterus – making her the child’s biological mother. Meanwhile, with a gestational carrier, she is NOT the biological mother, as she is carrying a child for the “intended parents.” Meaning, that the couple’s egg and sperm are transferred to the carrier’s uterus by way of IVF.

Couples may use a carrier for a multitude of reasons.

Women may opt to use the service if they have suffered multiple miscarriages, have undergone a hysterectomy, have a condition like heart disease that could make pregnancy risky, have tried and failed at several cycles of IVF on their own, or have uterine scarring. Homosexual male couples may also turn to a gestational carrier to have a child.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email