Battling Transthyretin (TTR) Cardiac Amyloidosis? Learn More About Your Treatment Options

1 in 25 Blacks is stricken with the Val122Ile mutation in the transthyretin gene that results in an age-dependent, late-onset restrictive/hypertrophic cardiomyopathy that can mimic other forms of heart failure leading to misdiagnosis and underdiagnosis. The transthyretin (TTR) cardiac amyloidosis type, in particular, is underdiagnosed in elderly Black populations and should be suspected in any adult patient of this descent who has unexplained left wall thickening on echocardiogram with or without macroglossia. Increased awareness of this entity will identify more patients with cardiac amyloidosis, thereby allowing timely medication and treatments.

People who have cardiomyopathy but no signs or symptoms may not need treatment. Sometimes, dilated cardiomyopathy that comes on suddenly may even go away on its own.

In other instances, treatment is needed. Treatment hinges on a few factors: the type of cardiomyopathy, the severity of your symptoms and complications as well as your age and overall health.

According to The American Heart Association, your doctor may prescribe medicines to:

Lower your blood pressure: ACE inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, beta blockers and calcium channel blockers are examples of medicines that lower blood pressure.

Slow your heart rate: Beta blockers, calcium channel blockers, and digoxin are examples of medicines that slow the heart rate. Beta blockers and calcium channel blockers also are used to lower blood pressure.

Keep your heart beating with a normal rhythm: These medicines, called