Studies Show Ending Smoking Helps Shield Women from Bladder Cancer

Although Blacks usually smoke fewer cigarettes and start smoking cigarettes at an older age, they are more likely to die from smoking-related diseases than whites. Additionally, if you’re an older woman who smokes, quitting may bring a health benefit you haven’t considered: A new study suggests it lowers your risk of bladder cancer.

The largest decline in risk was in the first 10 years after quitting, with a modest but steady decline in the following years.
Bladder cancer is fairly rare, about 4.6% of new cancer cases in 2019, but is the most common type of urinary system cancer.

It often recurs and it has a significant death rate, according to study author Dr. Yueyao Li, a Ph.D. candidate in the School of Public Health at Indiana University in Bloomington.

While bladder cancer is more common in men, women often have worse outcomes even when diagnosed at similar stages.

Smoking is a known risk factor, but findings of the link between

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