What’s Your Mouth Trying To Tell You?

African American Black man flossing teethWhat are the top oral health warning signs? Did you know that your mouth can signal health concerns in other parts of your body?

Some dental conditions such as bad breath and puffy gums can be signs of gum disease. But other oral symptoms, however, may point to something more. So take a look at the below oral symptoms to find out what they could be telling you about your overall health:

Bad Breath. Everyone experiences stinky breath, but brushing and flossing (including brushing your tongue or using a tongue scraper) should nip bad breath in the bud. What about when it doesn’t? It could be a sign of advanced gum disease, so it’s important to talk to your dentist before this oral condition ruins perfectly healthy teeth, says David M. Leader, DMD, assistant clinical professor at the Tufts University School of Dental Medicine in Boston.

Most of the time, however, the biggest bad-breath culprit is your diet. “Onion, garlic, and pungent spices will produce mouth odor for hours after consumption,” Dr. Leader says. In addition, people who have uncontrolled diabetes, eat a high-protein diet, or suffer from alcoholism tend to have breath with a sweet or fruity odor, from a metabolic condition called ketoacidosis.

Swollen Gums. Swollen gums is another sign of gum disease. Even if you believe you have healthy teeth, swollen gums absolutely require a visit to the dentist. Your dentist or dental hygienist will be able to tell right away if you have gum disease — but you can check for swollen gums yourself by drying your gums with a napkin or a tissue and looking in the mirror. “The surface of the gum close to the teeth should appear pebbled like a basketball, not smooth and shiny,” Leader says. And although your swollen gums may feel fine, they tend to bleed during brushing.

Eroded Tooth Enamel. During dental erosion, the surface of a tooth or teeth gradually wears away. Any source of acid can erode the tooth enamel of healthy teeth, including acid from citrus fruits and soda. But one of the most common sources of acid in the mouth is due to gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD, a condition in which acid from the stomach comes up the esophagus, causes heartburn, and reaches the mouth, says Leader. Another cause of this dental health problem may be bulimia, the eating disorder in which people frequently binge on a large meal and then purge by vomiting.

Sour Taste In Your Mouth.
If you frequently have a sour taste in your mouth (which is often mistaken for bad breath), it could be another sign of GERD, especially if it’s accompanied by a sore throat, chest pain, and a hoarse voice, Leader warns. Besides this oral condition and dental erosion, GERD can lead to other problems such as an esophageal ulcer and inflammation of the esophagus. If you suspect you have GERD, get tested and treated as needed.

Dry Mouth. Also known as xerostomia, dry mouth is a very common oral condition, especially as you age, Leader says. There are also more than 425 medications that include dry mouth as a side effect. But dry mouth can be related to issues beyond dental health. It’s also a common symptom of diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, systemic lupus erythematosus, and Sjogren’s syndrome. If you have chronic dry mouth, you should be concerned and talk to your dentist, Leader advises. You can also find clinics that specialize in treating this condition.

Loose Teeth. Loose teeth are another dental health symptom not to ignore because this may be a sign that you have gum disease, a potentially serious oral condition. Bacteria that grow below the gum line can cause tissues and bones to break down, leading to the separation of the teeth from the gums. As more tissue and bone is destroyed, the more likely you are to lose healthy teeth as they become loose and need to be pulled.

Loose teeth may also be a sign of infection or scleroderma, a disease of the connective tissue that causes changes in the skin, blood vessels, muscles, and organs.

Mouth Sores. Did you know that a white or red patch on the tongue or lining of the mouth is the most common sign of oral cancer? But don’t be alarmed: Mouth sores are completely common and the chance your sore signals cancer is low. To be safe, show your dentist any sores in your mouth that don’t heal after two weeks.

Mouth sores from oral cancer tend to occur along with other oral conditions, such as a strange taste in the mouth, problems chewing, pain when you swallow, and having trouble with speech.

Burning Mouth. If you’re experiencing a moderate to severe scalding sensation in your mouth, lips, or tongue, it could be an oral condition called burning mouth syndrome. Fortunately, burning mouth syndrome is not very common, Leader says. When it does occur, it can be caused by a number of medications, certain specific oral conditions, or other health issues, including nutritional deficiencies, fungal infections in the mouth, and hormone changes in women.

[ione_media_gallery id=”16824″]

SHARE YOUR OPINION

Would you subscribe to a service where you can see a black doctor anytime via video chat for $19 a month?

Does Diabetes Double Your Alzheimer’s Risk?

type 1 diabetes needle(BlackDoctor.org) – The African American population, due to high risk of diabetes and hypertension, are at a greater risk of developing alzheimer’s.

People with diabetes are at increased risk of having a heart attack or stroke at an early age, but that’s not the only worry. Diabetes appears to dramatically increase a person’s risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease or other types of dementia later in life.

In a new study, which included more than 1,000 men and women over age 60, researchers found that people with diabetes were twice as likely as the other study participants to develop Alzheimer’s disease within 15 years. They were also 1.75 times more likely to develop dementia of any kind.

“It’s really important for the public to understand that diabetes is a significant risk factor for all of these types of dementia,” says Rachel Whitmer, Ph.D., an epidemiologist in the research division of Kaiser Permanente Northern California, a nonprofit health-care organization based in Oakland, Calif.

Whitmer, who studies risk factors for Alzheimer’s but wasn’t involved in the new research, stresses that many questions remain about the link between diabetes and dementia. The new study was “well done” and provides “really good evidence that people with diabetes are at greater risk,” she says, “but we really need to look at other studies to find out why.”

Diabetes could contribute to dementia in several ways, which researchers are still sorting out. Insulin resistance, which causes high blood sugar and in some cases leads to type 2 diabetes, may interfere with the body’s ability to break down a protein (amyloid) that forms brain plaques that have been linked to Alzheimer’s. High blood sugar (glucose) also produces certain oxygen-containing molecules that can damage cells, in a process known as oxidative stress.

In addition, high blood sugar—along with high cholesterol—plays a role in the hardening and narrowing of arteries in the brain. This condition, known as atherosclerosis, can bring about vascular dementia, which occurs when artery blockages (including strokes) kill brain tissue.

“Having high glucose is a stressor to the nervous system and to the blood vessels,” says David Geldmacher, M.D., a professor of neurology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. “The emerging information on Alzheimer’s disease and glucose shows us that we do need to remain vigilant on blood sugar levels as we get older.”

Studies dating back to the late 1990s have suggested that people with diabetes are more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia, but the research has been marred by inconsistent definitions of both diabetes and dementia.

The authors of the new study, led by Yutaka Kiyohara, M.D., an environmental medicine researcher at Kyushu University, in Fukuoka, sought to address this weakness by using the gold standard of diabetes diagnosis, an oral glucose tolerance test. This involves giving a person a sugar-loaded drink after they have fasted for at least 12 hours, and then measuring how much glucose remains in their blood two hours later.

At the beginning of the study, the tests showed that 15% of the participants had full-fledged diabetes, while 23% had prediabetes, also known as impaired glucose tolerance.

The participants were all dementia-free when the tests were done, but over the next 15 years 23% received a diagnosis of dementia. Slightly less than half of those cases were deemed to be Alzheimer’s disease, with the remainder roughly split between vascular dementia and dementia due to other causes. (The diagnoses were confirmed with brain scans of living patients and brain autopsies in deceased patients.)

Both diabetes and prediabetes were associated with an increased risk of dementia diagnosis, although the association was weaker for prediabetes. And the link persisted even after the researchers took into account several factors associated with both diabetes and dementia risk, such as age, sex, blood pressure, and body mass index.