Is Sex During Pregnancy Safe?

pregnant couple in bed(BlackDoctor.org) — Pregnancy is a wonderful thing in a warm loving relationship, but it can have a powerful affect on your sex life. It is a widely known fact that sex during a pregnancy is doctor approved, but there are some routines that may need to be adjusted.

What positions are okay?

As your pregnancy progresses, experiment to find the most comfortable positions, but avoid lying flat on your back during sex. If your uterus compresses the veins in the back of your abdomen, you may feel lightheaded or nauseous.

What about oral sex?

If you have oral sex, make sure your partner does not blow air into your vagina. Rarely, a burst of air may block a blood vessel (air embolism) — which could be a life-threatening condition for you and the baby.

Can orgasms trigger premature labor?

Orgasms can cause uterine contractions. But these contractions are different from the contractions you’ll feel during labor. Research indicates that if you have a normal pregnancy, orgasms — with or without intercourse — don’t lead to premature labor or premature birth.

Are there times when sex should be avoided?

Although most women can safely have sex throughout pregnancy, sometimes it’s best to be cautious.

Avoid sex during these situations:

• Preterm labor. Exposure to the prostaglandins in semen may cause contractions — which could be worrisome if you’re at risk of preterm labor.
• Vaginal bleeding. Sex is not recommended if you have unexplained vaginal bleeding.
• Problems with the cervix. If your cervix begins to open prematurely (cervical incompetence), sex may pose a risk of infection.
• Problems with the placenta. If your placenta partly or completely covers your cervical opening (placenta previa), sex could lead to bleeding and preterm labor.
• Multiple babies. If you’re carrying two or more babies, your doctor may advise you not to have sex late in pregnancy — although researchers have not identified any relationship between sex and preterm labor in twins.

What if I don’t want to have sex?

That’s OK. There’s more to a sexual relationship than intercourse. Share your needs and concerns with your partner in an open and loving way. If sex is difficult, unappealing or off-limits, try cuddling, kissing or massage.

After the baby is born, how soon can I have sex?

Whether you give birth vaginally or by C-section, your body will need time to heal. Many doctors recommend waiting six weeks before resuming intercourse. This allows time for your cervix to close and any tears or a repaired episiotomy to heal.

If you’re too sore or exhausted to even think about sex, maintain intimacy in other ways. Share short phone calls throughout the day or occasional soaks in the tub. When you’re ready to have sex, take it slow — and use a reliable method of contraception.

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