9 Doctor’s Office Mistakes You’re Making

Doctor with patient
Doctors aren’t perfect. But sometimes, patients unknowingly do things that may sabotage successful treatment. Are you doing certain things in the doctor’s office that prevent you from getting the quality care you need?

Most doctors see their relationship with their patients as a partnership, where both of you need to work together.

Here are the top 10 things doctors want you to stop doing, so that they can take better care of you.

Lying. From sexual practices to bad eating habits, many patients choose not to disclose the full truth to their physicians. Unfortunately, the only way a doctor can treat you to the best of their ability is if they have as complete a picture as possible about your particular health needs. Stop being so afraid that your doctor will judge you, and start telling them the truth.

Not describing what you’re feeling accurately. Is your pain sharp or dull? Is your headache more in your temple or towards the middle of your head? These details may not seem important, but they can help your doctor make the right diagnosis for you to start feeling better.

Doctors agree that if possible, you should describe the exact location of your problem, how intense the pain is, what may have provoked it and how long it’s lasted. To help you remember, write down your symptoms, as well as any questions that you may have for the doctor during your appointment.

Not telling your doctor what you expect from them. If you have certain hopes or expectations, such as a particular prescription or getting rid of a suspicious-looking mole. This isn’t to say that the doctor will always be able to deliver on your requests, but at least they’ll have a better idea of how to approach your care and be able to clearly explain what they can and can’t do for you.

Not bringing in a list of your medications and supplements. Doctors would love for more patients to tell them exactly what they’re taking, so that when they’re considering a form of treatment, they have all the information they need to provide a more reliable course of action.

Leaving with unaddressed concerns. If you have a question, ask, even if you think the doctor is rushed. If you’re…