Gospel Star David Peaston Dies

A woman kneeling at church holding rosaryR&B/gospel singer David Peaston, best known for the singles, “Two Wrongs (Don’t Make it Right)” and “Can I?”, has died at 54 years old. The exact details of his deah are not currently known, though he did suffer from diabetes and diabetes complication, having had his legs amputated, forcing him to use prosthesis in his later years.

Born in St. Louis, MO, Peaston was a former schoolteacher, who, in the late 1980s, won several competitions on the Showtime at the Apollo television show, impressing the the audience with a powerful rendition of “God Bless the Child.”

Peaston won a Soul Train Music Award in 1990 for Best R&B/Soul or Rap New Artist.

Peaston’s mother, Martha Bass, was a member of The Clara Ward Singers gospel group. His older sister is R&B/soul singer Fontella Bass. In 1993, he recorded a gospel album with Fontella and Martha Bass entitled Promises: A Family Portrait Of Faith. He also sang on Lester Bowie’s The One and Only.

In 2006, David Peaston returned to music with his album, Song Book: Songs of Soul & Inspiration. The album featured eight new tracks by Peaston, as well as several of his biggest hits.

Diabetes Facts…

Diabetes is a disease in which the body has problems producing or using insulin, a hormone needed to convert sugar, starches and other food into energy.

Compared to the general population, African Americans are disproportionately affected by diabetes:

• 4.9 million (an increase from 3.7 million in 2007), or 18.7% of all African Americans, aged 20 years or older, also have diabetes.

• African Americans are 1.8 times more likely to have diabetes as non Hispanic whites.

• 25 percent of African Americans between the ages of 65 and 74 have diabetes.

• 1 in 4 African American women over 55 years of age has diabetes.

For healthy, everyday ways to manage diabetes, visit BlackDoctor.org’s Living With Diabetes Channel.

Your Immunity: The Moves That Help & Hurt It

african american man running

(BlackDoctor.org) — A famous doctor once said, “There’s only one way to treat the common cold — with contempt.” And for good reason. The average adult has two to three respiratory infections each year. That number jumps to six or seven for young children.

Whether or not you get sick with a cold after being exposed to a virus depends on many factors that affect your immune system. Old age, cigarette smoking, mental stress, poor nutrition and lack of sleep have all been associated with impaired immune function and increased risk of infection.

Keeping the immune system in good shape

Can regular exercise help keep your immune system in good shape? Researchers are just now supplying some answers to this new and exciting question. Fitness enthusiasts have frequently reported that they experience less sickness than their sedentary peers. For example, a survey conducted during the ’80s revealed that 61 percent of 700 recreational runners reported fewer colds since they began running, while only 4 percent felt they had experienced more.

Further research has shown that during moderate exercise, several positive changes occur in the immune system. Various immune cells circulate through the body more quickly, and are better able to kill bacteria and viruses. Once the moderate exercise bout is over, the immune system returns to normal within a few hours.

In other words, every time you go for a brisk walk, your immune system receives a boost that should increase your chances of fighting off cold viruses over the long term.

Should you exercise when sick?

Fitness enthusiasts and endurance athletes alike are often uncertain of whether they should exercise or rest when sick. Although more research is needed, most sports medicine experts in this area recommend that if you have symptoms of a common cold with no fever (i.e., symptoms are above the neck), moderate exercise such as walking is probably safe.

Intensive exercise should be postponed until a few days after the symptoms have gone away. However, if there are symptoms or signs of the flu (i.e., fever, extreme tiredness, muscle aches, swollen lymph glands), then at least two weeks should probably be allowed before you resume intensive training.

Staying in shape to exercise

For athletes who are training intensely for competition, the following guidelines can help reduce their odds of getting sick.

  1. Eat a well-balanced diet. The immune system depends on many vitamins and minerals for optimal function. However, at this time, there is no good data to support supplementation beyond 100 percent of the Recommended Dietary Allowances.
  2. Avoid rapid weight loss. Low-calorie diets, long-term fasting and rapid weight loss have been shown to impair immune function. Losing weight while training heavily is not good for the immune system.
  3. Obtain adequate sleep. Major sleep disruption (e.g., three hours less than normal) has been linked to immune suppression.
  4. Avoid overtraining and chronic fatigue. Space vigorous workouts and race events as far apart as possible. Keep “within yourself” and don’t push beyond your ability to recover.