Signs You Need To See An Allergist

african american woman blowing her nose

By now, many of us are well aware of our bodies as far as allergies go. But, as we age, our bodies change and that includes the things that we are allergic to. If you find yourself taking allergy medicine a little more than usual or if you experience a flare after eating something you’re “not allergic to,” it might be time to visit an allergist.

READ: 5 Allergy Relieving Foods

Most times, when we talk about getting tested, it’s for things like sexually transmitted illnesses, mental illnesses, or sleep disorders. But, we rarely talk about getting tested for allergies. So, it’s very common for someone not to know such testing exists. But, luckily for us, it does.

Allergy symptoms occur when your immune system overreacts to something that is harmless to most people but triggers a reaction in anyone sensitive to it (also known as an allergen), according to the American College for Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (ACAAI).

Symptoms

“The release of histamine can cause a variety of symptoms, including a skin rash, headache, sneezing, runny nose, swelling, nausea and diarrhea. The most severe reaction, known as anaphylaxis, can be life-threatening,” according to ACAAI.

Some of the most common allergens include pollen, dust, animal fur, mold, insect stings and a host of delicious foods like nuts, shellfish, and dare I say… chocolate!

READ: Essential Oils for Allergy Relief

According to ACCAI, “If the allergen is something you breathe in, your reaction will most likely affect your eyes, nose and lungs. If the allergen is something you consume, you’re more likely to have symptoms in your mouth, stomach and intestines.”