Protect Yourself From ‘Swimmer’s Ear’

Attractive Man in a Swimming PoolIt’s high season for the painful infection known as swimmer’s ear, but it shouldn’t spoil your fun if you plan ahead.

Swimmer’s ear often happens when germy water stays in the ear after a dip in the pool or lake. The leftover water creates an environment that helps bacteria grow.

“Swimming is a significant risk factor, especially in fresh water,” said Kara Jones-Schubart, a clinical assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Nursing. “For most people, swimmer’s ear is a one-time occurrence, but for others, it can take a more chronic form.”

The main symptom is redness in the outer ear along with warmth and pain. Parts of the ear may be tender when touched. The ear can also feel full, itchy and irritated, and it may be harder to hear.

Fortunately, there are several ways to prevent swimmer’s ear.